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8 Habits to Keep Yourself Motivated with A Strategic Online Business

8 Habits to Keep Yourself Motivated with A Strategic Online Business
8 Habits to Keep Yourself Motivated with A Strategic Online Business The online clothing business is growing in its reach for a great many reasons. First of all, individuals are living a busy life, and shopping online saves a significant amount of time. Also, the ecommerce industry is a growing culture, and conventional retail therapy is a dying breed. That is why the clothing brand that you have developed deserves a robust online outlet so that it can get its true admirers on the internet cloud. Here are a few habits that will help you reach success with online business and help you win the online shopping sphere. 1. Online Entrepreneur and the Balance of Success: The Internet is a unique realm where overnight success and endless failure are both equally probable. The main factor that differentiates the successful online entrepreneur from a failed online seller is the fact of tricks up their sleeves. The entrepreneur who has cracked the code to online success will achieve success beyond belief while the one who struggles with grasping the main concepts shall falter. In a word, that trick has to be named as ‘effectiveness’; the reason being that the online strategies that you implement have to be useful for your online plan to be effective. So here are the habits that will increase your effectiveness in creating an online sales and marketing strategy. 2. Improving E-Commerce Experience: Any online marketing and sales venture are only as good as the experience that the customers are getting from the rand. E-commerce like Linen clothing for women sold online is an endless venture where customer complaints, order deliveries, and other issues crop up on an everyday basis. Make sure that you have a smooth and continuous process to ensure that the customer service that you provide is going smoothly. Whether you are managing e-commerce yourself, or have people in place, make a habit of sticking to your customer engagement regularly. Word of Mouth: The online community is the new local community. A right word of mouth and an honest review from the customer is the key to a successful trust-building exercise online. The more satisfied and trusting customers you have, the better your brand will perform. Strong Brand: The brand that has a reliable customer service also has a robust online identity. The customer service representatives also feel energized to work in the brand if they know that they are closely supervised and are held accountable. 3. Know Your Business: Many businesses are launched online without any need for more in-depth knowledge. The reason being that as long as you have a consumer base and the product in hand, all you need is a shipping option, and you are good to go. Your product will take off, and your company is ready to sell its products. But that is no reason not to understand your funnel process thoroughly. Make sure that you know all the minute details of your business and keep in touch with current and upcoming technological and marketing options for your product type. This will allow you to experiment frequently and expand your business when the time is right. Network: We cannot emphasize this point enough; networking in your field is crucial to success in the ventures you are undertaking. There is a great need for ensuring that you have proper connections in your industry because they are continuously needed in business conduction. 4. Business Evaluation Metrics: The metrics that are commonly used in the evaluation of the business are crucial to the success of the market itself. These metrics are scientific methods devised to ensure that the company is objectively...
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5 Productivity Tips for Small Business Owners

5 Productivity Tips for Small Business Owners
5 Productivity Tips for Savvy Small Business Owners Starting your own business is an exciting journey. You’re the boss! You make the rules…and you are largely responsible for setting your own hours, keeping your own workspace organized, and making sure your company reaches scheduled goals. Keeping your employees on track – not to mention staying productive yourself – can be a difficult task. These helpful tips show you how to make a few small changes which will dramatically increase your business’s overall productivity. Set Work Hours – And Stick to Them! Once you step away from the “normal” 9-to-5 workday, you run into a problem: deciding when to work. With the entire day available to you, it’s surprisingly easy to fall into the trap of “I’ll do it later”. Many small business owners find themselves struggling through the difficult early days of company growth working late into the night, battling endless distractions and adopting unsustainable sleep schedules. Avoid this by setting a schedule and stick to it. Work in 3 to 5-hour chunks with time blocked off for breaks in between. Once the workday is over, log out of your business accounts to avoid the temptation to keep working ‘round the clock. Learn to Love Mornings You may be surprised to find that the average human is much more productive in the mornings. Our brains are awake, we’ve just gotten plenty of sleep, and distractions are less frequent as our friends and family are generally also working. Even if you’ve never been a “morning person,” you should give it a try! Wake up an hour – or even just a half hour – earlier than usual and spend that time working. You might be surprised to find out just how much you get done before lunchtime. Those formerly miserable morning hours can turn into prime productive, business-growing time! Don’t Be Afraid to Delegate Another productivity-destroying trap many small business owners get caught in is the desire to “do it all”. Wanting to be aware of everything that goes on, they waste time struggling through small, tedious tasks such as entering data, fussing with payroll details, and even keeping track of every employee’s schedules. Delegate some of these tasks to partners and employees within your business. This will give you, as the owner, more time to focus on the big picture: setting goals, securing funding and building relationships with clients and customers. This will benefit the entire business – workers will have clearly defined tasks and goals as well as be given chances to develop their own initiative, leadership and organizational skills. Introduce Productivity Tools Today, a wide variety of productivity tools are available, ranging from websites to smartphone apps to good old-fashioned journals and calendars. Take advantage of these tools to keep yourself and your employees organized and on track at all times! Set up a chat client so you can stay in touch with your team without needing to exchange endless emails. Have employees set up to-do lists on a shared web site or app so that you can keep up with in-progress projects. Create your own weekly schedule and check in at the end of each workday to see whether you’re on track to meet company goals. Schedule Self-Care and Rewards Finally, remember that the true secret to productivity isn’t forcing yourself to work endless hours and produce maximum output at all times – it’s taking breaks to focus on yourself! A good, well-scheduled self-care focused break will leave you feeling mentally and physically refreshed and ready when it’s time to get back to work. Schedule breaks throughout the day, ranging from shorter 15-minute pauses to longer...
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4 Questions to Ask When Choosing A Financial Advisor

4 Questions to Ask When Choosing A Financial Advisor
4 Questions to Ask When Choosing A Financial Advisor Research indicates that many people are intimidated by money and are, therefore, not so great at managing their personal finances. That’s because most people lack personal finance knowledge, according to sources. As a result, only 40% of Americans would be able to cover a $1,000 unexpected expense, Bankrate reveals. That means they’re only one emergency away from bankruptcy. About the Author: Michael Deane has been working in marketing for almost a decade and has worked with a huge range of clients, which has made him knowledgeable on many different subjects. He has recently rediscovered a passion for writing and hopes to make it a daily habit. You can read more of Michael’s work at Qeedle. Not knowing the basics about money management can cost you a lot (much more than what you would pay for the services of a financial expert). If you are one of those confused individuals, turning to a financial advisor seems like a logical choice. But how to choose one? Here are some questions to help you choose the right financial advisor for you.  1. How Will You Help Me Reach My Financial Goals? Let’s start with the basics. You would like to start saving for your retirement or you’re interested in becoming an investor but have no clue how to begin. The first thing you should ask your potential financial advisors is, therefore, this: how will you help me achieve that? In order to answer, the potential financial advisor will have to ask you several questions first. Don’t worry, that’s what they do. In order to help you achieve your financial goals, the advisor must know what your goals are, whether you’re looking for long-term or short-term wealth growth, if you are thinking about early, what is your current financial situation, how much you earn, etc. After receiving this information, the advisor will then recommend the best path for you to follow in order to achieve your goals. Keep in mind that the questions above are crucial for you to know whether to hire said financial advisor. They should not simply give you generic advice before hearing the details about your financial situation. 2. What Qualifications/Credentials Do You Have? Don’t forget to ask the financial advisor you’re talking to about their credentials and qualifications. Why should you hire them? Why is this important? Because there are countless financial advisors out there  and unfortunately, not all of them are equally good at what they do. You want someone you can trust with your finances. As you yourself don’t know much about personal finances, it would be easy for someone to misguide you when it comes to money management. Try to find a way to check their credentials and ask about their previous clients. Perhaps there’s someone you know among them so you can check this information. Speaking of that, if you don’t want to risk it, you should ask a friend or family member to recommend a financial advisor that has helped them before. 3. How Much Do You Charge and How Are You Paid? You have the right to know what this service will cost you so make sure that you don’t forget this question. You should know how much they charge and how they are paid too. Are they paid by commission or is there a flat fee? Some financial advisors charge a percentage for the assets that they manage while others charge an hourly fee. Knowing exactly how much the service will cost you will help you determine which financial advisor to hire. If you can’t afford an expensive advisor, perhaps you should...
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An Introduction to Contracts With Customers

An Introduction to Contracts With Customers
Do you remember the first sale that you ever booked or made on your own? It was probably pretty exciting — that feeling of elation and top-of-the-mountain. You suddenly realize that you might understand how this whole business thing works and you might be able to do this. But of course there are practicalities to consider when you make a sale. It can be tempting to recognize revenue right away, but there’s always a risk. What if the sale cancels, for example? What if it costs more to create the product or service than you’ve booked? It just can be a difficult process to learn the ins and outs of recognizing revenue. Standards to Recognize Revenue Fortunately there are standards to use that others have figured out. These standards are a great way for companies to make sure that people understand what they are doing is on the up and up. Non-accountants must be aware of the concept of recognizing revenue from contracts with customers. Because payments are often not a straightforward affair, accountants have to allocate revenue using specific standards set by national and international accounting boards. While this information doesn’t seem important for non-accountants to understand, it is. Knowing when revenue can be recognized in your company’s financials affects everyone, from the salesperson’s commission to the marketing budget next quarter. What are those standards and what are the takeaways from them? This graphic explains it.   To understand and accomplish the new revenue recognition standards, businesses should complete the following five steps:  1. Identify the contract with your customers Clearly identify the goods or services provided and describe each party’s right to them   2. Identify your performance obligations Specify exactly what you owe your customers and explain what defines “good performance.”   3. Determine the price of your products or services When doing so, don’t forget to consider promotions and other discounts.   4. Allocate a transaction price to the obligations specified in the contract Align the price of your services with your compnay’s performance obligations   5. Recognize revenue as performance obligations are satisfied   Sales people also must understand the difference between booking and revenue. A booking is when the customer makes a commitment via a contract to buy your services or product. Revenue is when the revenue “counts” on the books – When accounting can account for the revenue as being...
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What is Equity and Why is it Important to Your Business

What is Equity and Why is it Important to Your Business
What is Equity and Why is it Important to Your Business?   So, you’ve finally started your own business. You are officially an entrepreneur. While you might feel a fleeting sense of accomplishment, it may not last forever. For many new business owners, the thrill of starting a business wears off quickly and is replaced, at least in part, by worry. Will your business be profitable? Have you taken every legal step possible to make it a legitimate endeavor? Did you borrow too much money to start your business? How long will it take to be profitable? While there are many notions to understand as a business owner, equity is a key concept and you should have a firm knowledge base of how it works. It is essentially what will drive your business and its profitability.   What is Equity? Equity is essentially the value of any asset, in this case your business, minus any liabilities on that asset. A liability may be a loan or debt that is owed against the business. Here is an example: If you bought your business’s physical building for $400,000 and the mortgage balance is $200,000, your equity is $200,000.   There is also the concept of owner’s equity. This is essentially the total amount of equity you, as the owner, have in your company. Let’s look at this in another example. If your company has $200,000 in total assets but also carries $50,000 in total debt, your total equity in the business is $150,000. A simpler way to think of owner’s equity is that it is the amount of money that would be left over if you sold all of your business assets and then paid off all of your business debts. The lower your debts, the likelier you are to have positive equity in your business and the higher the probability you would make a profit should you decide to sell it.   Negative Equity Negative equity, as its name suggests, is not a good thing for any business owner. It applies to the concept of when your ownership interest in your business is equal to less than your liabilities and debts. So, for example, if you purchased your business’s building for $300,000 and took out a loan for $250,000 to pay for it but the value drops to $200,000, you now have negative equity. That is because the value of the building is now less than the balance owed on it. You want to avoid negative equity as much as possible. You would not be able to sell your business for a profit if you had negative equity.   Types of Equity You can have both tangible and intangible assets in your business. Tangible assets are those that you can physical touch. If you run a business that keeps an inventory of product, that inventory is a tangible asset. An intangible asset cannot be touched but may even be more valuable than a tangible one. An intangible asset might be the reputation of your business. This can obviously bring you more customers. Another intangible asset might be brand identity. Everyone knows, for example, that golden arches represent McDonald’s. The more recognizable your brand, the better. If customers know you, they may use you for your services or goods.   Importance of Equity Equity is of the utmost importance when it comes to your business. As your owner’s equity increases as time goes on, you can potentially sell your business and turn a profit. So, if you want to eventually make a profitable business, you need to be consistently building equity in it. This means the value of your business should...
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