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Why Strategic Leadership is Important

Why Strategic Leadership is Important
Strategic Leadership in Organizations Every person is bestowed with innumerable opportunities through-out his/her life time. Very few are able to identify those angelistic gateways to success; I don’t agree with the age-old saying “Opportunity knocks the door only once.” In this dynamic world we are in a position to create opportunities and build our businesses around to witness our dreams turning into reality. Have you got the spark in you? What started as a small spark of starting an online book store has instigated Sachin and Binny Bansal to build the top most online retail selling platform Flipkart. Bharat Matrimony founder Murugavel Janakiraman identified the unexplored niche of prospective marriage alliances over the internet by creating an online portal which facilitated girls and boys to project their profiles suitably and search for the man or woman of their dreams with ease minus embarrassment. A spark or an idea is what is needed to get into the groove to achieve something that delivers value not only to the creator but to the public over a period of time. Strategic leaders are not born, they are definitely made; they learn from their mistakes, have an eye for chances, molded by the environment they are exposed to and groom themselves to adapt to the setting. What is Strategic Leadership? Strategic leadership provides the vision and direction for the growth and success of an organization. A strategic leader institutionalizes a vision and helps the members of the organization to learn how to convert the objectives into action. A strategic leader also helps to sustain the momentum and interest of the people working under him by exuding the passion towards accomplishing the objectives in the long run. Organizations steered by strategic leaders are more successful in learning, both at the individual and group levels. Both the administrative and visionary traits of leadership are essential for organization-wide learning initiatives to succeed. The organization always needs to learn new things and at the same time, to systematize newly discovered approaches of learning. Strategic leaders believe human capital as an important factor in innovation and the creation of core competencies, and they invest considerable effort sustaining the health of this resource. These leaders attach consideration in building their organization’s resources, capabilities and competencies in order to gain appropriate, sustained competitive advantages. Strategic leaders very well know that focusing on the short term and forgetting about core competencies in the face of changing circumstances will prove to deliver disastrous results. Top Ten Characteristics of a Strategic Leader: Mission focused Ability to see the big picture Capable of matching organization’s objectives with the changing environment Creative approach to problem solving Futuristic thinking Emotionally Intelligent Build a strong team of capable people Clear about their choices Combine analytical vigor with serendipity Excellent communicators 3 Key Responsibilities of Strategic Leadership Take Responsibility for Vision, Alignment and Deployment Create a Culture of Empowerment Build...
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De-Stressing the Self

De-Stressing the Self
De-Stressing the Self India often looks at Japanese or American models to comprehend the concepts of management. In reality, Indian scriptures can be considered as treasuries of management. The Bhagavat Gita, the Vedas and the Epics highlight the true spirit of working together and the need for de-stressing the self for enhanced performance levels. The idea of NISHKAMYAM (to perform one’s own work without expecting a result) is truly said to be the highest ideology preached by Lord Krishna. Stress Management: 40+ easy ways to deal with stress What Induces Stress? A dynamic condition in which an individual is presented with an opportunity or confronted with a demand, related to what she or he desires and for which the outcome is uncertain but important, can be called a stressful situation. The consequences of stress in an organizational set up express themselves in the form of physiological, psychological or behavioral symptoms, which are harmful to the individuals who experience high levels of stress. Symptoms of stress: Anxiety Depression Increased job dissatisfaction Absenteeism Decline in productivity Rapid turn over High blood pressure Heart diseases Head aches Stress Can be Motivating: While long term stress is harmful to the individual and organization as well, it is said that short term stress serves the purpose of task accomplishment by individuals or groups, within the stipulated time. It serves as a motivation factor rather than a causative agent of frustration. It has been proved by scientists and medical researchers that stress has a direct effect on the metabolism of a person, that causes increase in heart and breathing rates, increase in blood pressure, thus inducing heart attacks. Equally important are the behavioral and attitudinal changes that are created by stress, which cannot be overlooked. Job Satisfaction: Psychological symptoms arise due to job-related dissatisfaction, boredom, work pressure, irritability and procrastination. Sometimes forceful involvement may also lead to decreased job satisfaction. The job to be carried out can be finished at the particular time if the individual is able to give one’s best shot. But when it is performed under stress, they complete the job with dissatisfaction. When the incumbent is asked to perform a task that lacks clarity, naturally ambiguity arises in his mind followed by anxiety. Behavioral Symptoms of Stress Changes in productivity levels, absence, and rapid staff turnover are stress symptoms of behavioral nature. It might be expressed even in the form of increased smoking, consumption of alcohol etc., Say for instance, in production department, when there is a need to supply a product in a very limited time, the workers may be active initially, but the performance slows down when they get totally tired or dissatisfied with the work. Again the demand by the superior adds additional stress that reaches unmanageable levels. Similarly, people taking care of administration, banking, marketing and other office related works fall a prey to stress. How to manage stress? From an organization view point, it is believed that a limited amount of stress may work wonders in terms of performance, with stress acting as a “positive stimulus”. But even low levels of stress are likely to be perceived as undesirable from an individual’s stand point. How could be the notion of management and individuals be different on the acceptable levels of stress? It does not solve the purpose. Individuals have to understand that, they have to live up to the expectations of the management in order to enhance their credit ratings, in terms of promotion and pay. They have to understand that challenges are to be perceived as opportunities to prove their mettle. Self and situational analysis, work analysis, time management and physical well- being are some...
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Evolution and Growth of Human Resource Management

Evolution and Growth of Human Resource Management
Evolution and Growth of Human Resource Management It is very interesting to trace out the evolution and growth of Human Resource Management. People – The Principal Resource: The principal resource of any organization is people and managing people is the most important and challenging aspect of an organization. What we call human resource management today, dates back to 1800 b.c.,which is evident from the inscriptions of Babylonian code of Hammurabi and Kautilya’s Arthasashtra, which explains in detail the importance of selection, incentives, performance evaluation, quality of a manager and wage rates. So,we understand that the concept of managing people has existed even in the previous eras through ancient literature and philosophy. India,China and Greece have been the origin points of human resource management concepts. Industrial Revolution: Till, 1930’s, there was no such department called “personnel management” that was considered necessary to cater to the needs and welfare of the labor society. The factory manager was acting as a link between the workers and the management, and most of the time he had to comply with the rules of the management to satisfy them, even if it were against the welfare of the workers. Also proper attention was not given to areas like, worker safety, security and living conditions. Industrial revolution saw mass exodus of workers to urban areas in search of jobs. How To Become a Profitable Social Media Manager (No Exp Req) Need for Employment Department: Application of science and technology in production made the rich owners even richer; the poor workers were not paid adequately and their life became miserable. Since the owners lost direct contact with the employees, managers came into the picture to take over control of production and administration. Machines ruled the industry and importance of labor got reduced. This condition existed for sometime until the advent of new and improved management concepts by people like F.W.Taylor who is considered to be the father of scientific management and B.F.Goodrich who was instrumental in forming the “employment department” which can be considered the fore runner of present human resource department. Introduction of Scientific Management: Scientific methods were introduced to make the workers perform the job with ease and perfection. It also saved enormous time and reduced the monotony of work. job-designs, job-specification, training and development and human relations were given due importance and the owners slowly started realizing the importance of labor. Through 1940’s to 1970’s behavioral approach was applied to professional management, the major architects being Abraham Maslow, Herzberg and Douglas McGregor. This approach suggested managers to modify their leadership styles to suit the type of followers and motivate the workers. Consequences of World War I and II: World War I and II also had profound influence on Human resource development. The concepts of role playing, improved training methods, supervision and group discussions came into the fray. The advent of labor unions also established a clear pathway for the workers to claim their rights, ably supported by the labor laws enacted by various governments. International labor organization was formed in 1919 which created sensation in the worker community all over the world. All said and done, empowerment of workers has been achieved only in developed nations where “job security” is no more a great concern because job opportunities are more. But in unorganized and small sectors, employers continue to exploit workers because “supply” is more than “demand”. The responsibility to develop and empower the employees solely lies on the shoulders of human resource department. It should try to address the problems of workers to the management and amicably settle issues relating to wages, welfare, safety and security. → Objectives and Functions of...
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