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Leadership Styles and Employee Motivation

Leadership Styles and Employee Motivation
Leadership Styles and Employee Motivation – A Purview 6 Things a Manager Can Learn From MS Dhoni Leading from the front Staying cool Sharing the due credit with fellow-men Encouraging team members to make them better performers Staying Grounded Resource Utilization No, this article is certainly not about our Indian Cricket team’s captain; but he has a lot to offer to prove my point. Yes, I was contemplating about the various leaders- both in the political and economic sectors and how their attitude and perspective has a direct effect on the followers or sub-ordinates. I thought it would be good to start from M.S.Dhoni, the all powerful leader in his own way standing tall and cool. Don’t miss this powerpoint: The powerpoint given here depicts the different leadership styles pertaining to an organization – be it business, service, non-profit or educational. The motive may differ for each of the listed organizations above but all have to function effectively to reach that ulterior motive. There can’t be a second thought or opinion on this and how the emotional quotient of a leader impacts employee motivation and engagement is something phenomenal. It is directly evident from the functioning style of the employees and their attitude even when you just enter an organization. The impact of leadership styles on employee motivation and performance from Shyama Shankar My Bad Encounter: Recently I had been to a dermatologist for a consultation and even before I could inquire about the doctor’s availability, the girl at the front desk was very particular to know if I would be willing to pay three hundred bucks. I was taken aback to know that the fee was two hundred bucks for visiting during regular hours and three hundred for late hours (It was a sunday and late hours meant visiting the doctor after 12 noon). The hundred rupees did not matter to me at all  but the way in which the man has trained his staff to put the patients into an uneasy position made me think – “Where service has to be the motto of his profession, money has REWRITTEN the ETIQUETTES in it own cruel way.” Matched Leadership: How to Use Leadership Styles Effectively Leadership style is one of the most debated topics in management which has influenced a great number of managers and employees. Leadership style extensively influences employee’s commitment and dedication. A participative and democratic kind of leader creates a positive work atmosphere, a coercive leader creates an unbalanced  and negative atmosphere; nevertheless all kinds of leaders create a serious impact whether negative or positive. Transformational leaders provide a vision and a sense of mission, inspire pride, and gain respect and trust through charisma, as opposed to a simple exchange and agreement,(Bass et al.1990) whereas Transactional leaders communicate with their subordinates to explain how a task must be done and let them know that there will be rewards for a job done well (Avolio et al.1991). Laissez-faire leadership is a passive kind of leadership style, seen as not caring about other’s issues. There is no relationship exchange between the leader and the followers. It represents a non-transactional kind of leadership style in which necessary decisions are not made, actions are delayed, leadership responsibilities ignored, and authority unused. Now it is time to enjoy some funny quotes on Leadership: Only one man in a thousand is a leader of men — the other 999 follow women. Groucho Marx First rule of leadership: everything is your fault. A Bug’s Life The problem with being a leader is that you’re never sure if you’re being followed or chased. Claire A. Murray The key to being a good manager is keeping the people who...
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Advantages of Strategic Management

Advantages of Strategic Management
Advantages of Strategic Management A couple of definitions on STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT Strategic management involves formulation and implementation of the major goals and plans taken by a company’s top management on behalf of owners, based on consideration of resources and an assessment of the internal and external environments in which the organization competes. The methodical analysis of the factors associated with customers and competitors (the external environment) and the organization itself (the internal environment) to provide the basis for maintaining optimum management practices is another well known definition.  The objective of strategic management is to achieve better alignment of corporate policies and strategic priorities. Advantages: 1. Discharges Responsibility The process of strategy formulation satisfies the expectation from shareholders, stakeholders and the general public at large, that a strategically managed organization will discharge its duties successfully. 2. Allows an Objective Assessment Strategic management provides a CONTROL that allows the senior management team to take a step back from the day-to-day business and CONTEMPLATE  about the future of the organization. 3. Faciliatates to Make Wise Business Decisions Strategy provides the framework within which EXECUTIVES at lower and middle levels can make day-to-day operational decisions that are aligned with the accomplishment of the organization’s goals. 4. Enables Understanding and Improves co-ordination between different departments Allowing participation in the strategic management process enables better understanding of the direction, why that direction was chosen, and the associated benefits. Good strategy formulation and communication process are vital steps in enabling effective and efficient strategy deployment. 5. Simplifies Measurement of Progress Strategy sets the direction and empowers an organization to bring into line its objectives and performance measures. These objectives and performance measures allow meaningful information to be provided to decision-makers regarding the organization’s progress through such tools as scorecards and dashboards. 6. Enhances Strategic Agility (Innovation) When a firm can successfully capitalize upon opportunities resulting from unanticipated and significant change, it is said to be innovative as it has a competitive edge over other firms. 7. Ensures Allocation of Resources: The limited resource is properly allocated to different functional levels so as to create value for all stakeholders. A targeted approach to markets and opportunities obviously strengthens your bottom line. A simple representation will make your understanding better: Enhanced Communication DIALOGUE PARTICIPATION | | Deeper/Improved Understanding OF OTHER’S VIEW OF WHAT THE FIRM IS DOING  | | Greater Commitment TO ACHIEVE OBJECTIVES TO IMPLEMENT STRATEGIES TO WORK HARD | | The Result ALL MANAGERS AND EMPLOYEES ON A SINGLE MISSION TO HELP FIRM SUCCEED...
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Top 50 HR Quotes

Top 50 HR Quotes
Popular HR Quotes by Industry Experts and Management Scholars 1. “Great Vision Without Great People Is Irrelevant.” -Jim Collins, Good To Great 2. “Human Resources Isn’t A Thing We Do. It’s The Thing That Runs Our Business.” -Steve Wynn, Wynn Las Vegas 3. “You Need To Have A Collaborative Hiring Process.” -Steve Jobs, Apple 4. “You Can’t Teach Employees To Smile. They Have To Smile Before You Hire Them.” -Arte Nathan, Wynn Las Vegas 5. “Never Hire Someone Who Knows Less Than You Do About What He’s Hired To Do.” -Malcolm Forbes, Forbes 6. “When Hiring Key Employees, There Are Only Two Qualities To Look For: Judgement And Taste. Almost Everything Else Can Be Bought By The Yard.” John W. Gardner 7. “Recently, I Was Asked If I Was Going To Fire An Employee Who Made A Mistake That Cost The Company $600,000. No, I Replied, I Just Spent $600,000 Training Him. Why Would I Want Somebody To Hire His Experience?” -Thomas John Watson Sr., Ibm 8. “It’s More Than Just Selling Pizzas. It’s Being A Good Fit For The Community. We Hire Based On The Betterment Of The Community As Much As Anything.” -Mark Starr, David’s Pizza. 9. “You Can Have The Best Strategy And The Best Building In The World, But If You Don’t Have The Hearts And Minds Of The People Who Work With You, None Of It Comes To Life.” -Renee West, Luxor And Excalibur Hotel 10. “I am convinced that nothing we do is more important than hiring and developing people. At the end of the day you bet on people, not on strategies.” -Lawrence Bossidy, Ge CURRENT TRENDS IN HRD 11. “Do Not Hire A Man Who Does Your Work For Money, But Him Who Does It For The Love Of It.” -Henry David Thoreau, Life Without Principle 12. “If You Think Hiring Professionals Is Expensive, Try Hiring Amateurs” -Anonymous 13. “The Key For Us, Number One, Has Always Been Hiring Very Smart People.” -Bill Gates, Microsoft 14. “Time Spent On Hiring Is Time Well Spent.” -Robert Half 15. “I Hire People Brighter Than Me And Then I Get Out Of Their Way” -Lee Iacocca, Ford  16. “You Cannot Push Anyone Up The Ladder Unless He Is Willing To Climb.” -Andrew Carnegie 17. “Management Is Nothing More Than Motivating Other People.” -Lee Iacocca, Ford  18. “There Are Few, If Any, Jobs In Which Ability Alone Is Sufficient. Needed, Also, Are Loyalty, Sincerity, Enthusiasm And Team Play.” -William B. Given, Jr. 19. “When People Go To Work, They Shouldn’t Have To Leave Their Hearts At Home.” -Betty Bender 20. “One Machine Can Do The Work Of Fifty Ordinary Men. No Machine Can Do The Work Of One Extraordinary Man.” -Elbert Hubbard 21. “To Find Joy In Work Is To Discover The Fountain Of Youth.” -Pearl S. Buck 22. “One Of The Symptoms Of An Approaching Nervous Breakdown Is The Belief That One’s Work Is Terribly Important.” -Bertrand Russell 23. “Opportunity Is Missed By Most People Because It Is Dressed In Overalls And Looks Like Work.”  -Thomas A. Edison 24. “Far And Away The Best Prize That Life Offers Is The Chance To Work Hard At Work Worth Doing.” -Theodore Roosevelt 25. ”Being Busy Does Not Always Mean Real Work. The Object Of All Work Is Production Or Accomplishment And To Either Of These Ends There Must Be Forethought, System, Planning, Intelligence, And Honest Purpose, As Well As Perspiration. Seeming To Do Is Not Doing.” -Thomas A. Edison 26. “Going To Work For A Large Company Is Like Getting On A Train. Are You Going Sixty Miles An Hour Or Is The Train Going Sixty Miles An Hour And You’re Just Sitting Still?” -J. Paul Getty 27. ”When...
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Organizational Climate

Organizational Climate
Organizational Climate – An Analogy Organizational climate is a measure of the feel of the internal environment of an organization which is perceived by an outsider and/or an employee according to their business with the organization. Organizational climate has a great effect on employees’ behavior. If the climate of an organization is open and friendly, employees feel relaxed and if it is very formal, then such a comfort level may not be felt. Climate for an organization is somewhat like personality for a person. “Just as every individual has a personality that makes him/her unique, an organization has a climate that clearly distinguishes its personality from other organizations. Human religionists introduced the concept of organizational climate in the late 1940’s. Now this has become a very useful metaphor for thinking about and describing the social aspects of a firm. Some definitions: “A set of characteristics that describe an organization and that i. Distinguish one organization from another ii. Are relatively enduring over a period of time and iii. Influence the behavior of people in the organization.” – Forehand and Gilmber “A mutually agreed internal (or molar) environmental description of an organization’s practices and procedures.” – Benjamin Schneider (1975) “A relatively ending quality of the internal environment that is experienced by the members, which influences their behavior and can describe in terms of values of a particular set of characteristics of the organization.” – Renato Tagiuri (1968) Features: It is an abstract and intangible concept. But it exercises a significant impact on the behavior and performance of organization members. It is the perceived aspect of organization’s internal environment. It refers to the relatively enduring characteristics which remain stable over a period of time. It gives a distinct identity to organization and differentiates it from others. It is a total expression of what the organization is. It is the summary perception which people have about organizations. It is a multi-dimensional concept. It consists of all organizational factors – authority pattern, leadership pattern, communication pattern, control etc.  Elements of Organizational Climate: Individual Autonomy: The extent to which employees are entrusted with to make decisions, the degree to which they are free to manage themselves and have the freedom to exercise their responsibility come under the purview of individual autonomy. Position Structure: It means the extent of direct supervision, formalization and centralization in an organization. Reward Orientation: The degree to which an organization rewards individuals for hard work or achievement. It will be high when an organization orients people to perform better and rewards them for doing so. Task Orientation: If the outlook of the top management is task oriented, the employees will have to speed up the pace of work to please their bosses. Relations Orientation or Consideration: Here the climate is conducive and supportive where the managers are relations-oriented while dealing with their sub-ordinates. The needs and aspirations of the workers will be given due importance resulting in enhanced team spirit. Job Satisfaction: The workers feel happy if the jobs are designed to allow the worker to use their innovative skills. Morale: Morale represents a composite of feelings, attitude and sentiments of organizational members towards the organization, superiors and fellow workers. If it is high, there will be an atmosphere of co-operation and if it is low, there will be conflicts and poor co-operation among the workers. They will also feel dis-oriented in their work. Control: The control systems may be either rigid or flexible. An impersonal or bureaucratic atmosphere is seen in the former situation where the scope of self-regulation will be minimum. DOWNLOAD THE PDF...
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“Introduction to Strategic Management”

“Introduction to Strategic Management”
Strategic Management by David Kryscynski This is the introduction lecture for Strategic Management. Very Innovative and Informative video.   A List of Strategic Management Terms Business – A strategy that pertains to single departments or units within a company. Combination – A type of grand strategy that employs several different grand strategies at once. Concentration – A growth strategy that extends the sale of current products or services to a company’s current market. Differentiation – A business strategy that strives to make the company’s product or service unique. Diversification – A growth strategy that moves a company into a similar kind of business with new or different products or services. Divestiture – A type of defensive strategy in which a company sells some part of its business, often an unprofitable part. Evaluating – The process of continuously monitoring the company’s progress toward its long-range goals and mission. Focus – A business strategy that directs marketing and sales towards a small segment of the market. Formal – The type of planning that involves systematic studying of an issue and the preparation of a written document to deal with the problem. Formulating strategy – Developing the grand- and business-level strategies to be used by the company. Functional – A strategy which involves short-range operational plans which support business strategies by emphasizing practical implementation. Goal – A concise statement that provides direction for employees and set standards for achieving the company’s strategic plan Grand – A type of strategy that provides overall direction for the company. Growth – A type of grand strategy developed when a company tries to expand sales, products, or number of employees. Implementing – Putting a strategy to work after it has been formulated. Intermediate – Covers the time span between short-range and long-range, usually 1-3 years or 1-5 years Liquidation – A type of defensive strategy in which the entire company is sold or dissolved. Long Term– A three-to-five year period of time, but possibly as far as 20 years into the future. Mission Statement – A brief summary explaining why a company exists. Operational – Short-range planning that focuses on forming ideas for dealing with specific functions in the company. Overall Cost Leadership – A business strategy that is designed to produce and deliver a product or service for a lower cost than the competition. Planning – The process that businesses use to decide the company’s goals for the future and the ways to achieve those goals. Policy – A broad general guide to action that establishes boundaries within which employees must operate. Procedure – A detailed series of related steps of tasks written to implement a policy. Retrenchment – A type of strategy that aims to reverse negative trends in a company, such as losses in sales. Rule – A specific and definite corporate action that employees must follow. Short Term– A one-year period of time. Stability – A type of strategy that aims to keep the company operating at the same level that it has for several years. Strategic – Long-range planning done by the highest management levels in the company. Strategic Management – The application of the basic planning process at the highest levels of the company. Strategy – An outline of the basic steps management is going to take to achieve a goal. SWOT Analysis – The most utilized process for determining a company’s overall health; it involves analyzing internal strengths, internal weaknesses, external opportunities, and external threats. Turnaround – A type of defensive strategy that is used to regain success. Vertical Integration – A growth strategy that moves a company into a market it previously served either as a supplier or as a customer....
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