About Us|Contact Us|Register|Login

[google-translator]

Blobitecture – Blob Architecture

Blobitecture – Blob Architecture
Blobitecture, also referred to as “blob  architecture” or “blobism“, refers to modern structures with an amorphous, blob-like shape. Blobitecture arose  in the  course  of  the  nineteen  nineties  when  CAD  methods have  been  first  being  designed  for  architects  and  interior  designers. The term ‘blob architecture’ was coined by architect Greg Lynn in 1995 in his experiments in digital design with metaball graphical software. Soon a range of architects and furniture designers began to experiment with this “blobby” software to create new and unusual forms. Blob architecture has given the world some of its most memorable and distinctive buildings, such as the experience music project in Seattle. Blobitecture is built to emulte nature, which is why it is considered to be organic architecture. Read on: A comprehensive guide on the 25 most popular interior design styles from Happy DIY Home –  your first step to finding a style that suits, with 25 of the most popular interior design styles broken down and explained, with simple steps for you to follow to realise in your own home.   This is a fantastic powerpoint presentation on this new idea, one of its kind – adding a new dimension to the imagination of architects. Created by budding architects of our team, this will open many new gates of imagination to the world of architecture. Buy this wonderful presentation to build your knowledge…. FOLLOW THIS LINK TO DOWNLOAD THE PRODUCT…. BLOBITECTURE...
read more

What are Source Documents

What are Source Documents
What are the Various Source Documents in Accounting? What is meant by source document? A source document is one used to record the transactions in the books of account. These documents stand as evidence for business transactions. These include Cash Memo Invoice Receipt Debit Note Credit Note Voucher Pay in Slip Cheque etc. 1. Cash Memo: When goods are sold or purchased for cash, the firm gives or receives cash memos with details regarding cash transactions. These documents become the basis for recording these transactions in the books of accounts. 2. Invoice: Invoice is prepared when goods are sold or purchased on credit. It contains the name of the party, quantity, price per unit and the total amount payable. The original copy is sent to the buyer and the duplicate copy is kept as proof of sale and for future reference. Types of Invoice: Inland Invoice – An invoice which is used in internal trade transaction is called as an Inland Invoice. When the goods are sold within a country, the invoice relating to such a transaction is called as an Inland Invoice. Foreign Invoice – An invoice which is prepared for covering an international trade transaction is called as a Foreign Invoice. A number of copies are prepared, maybe even 10 to 12, because a number of authorities require it. Inward Invoice – Inward invoice is received by the buyer from the seller, on receipt of invoice; the buyer stamps it with date of receipt. The inward invoice number is entered in the purchase journal. Outward Invoice – Outward Invoice is a seller’s bill. An invoice which is inward to the buyer is an outward for a seller. It is called outward invoice, because it is sent to the buyer. At least one copy of the invoice is retained by the seller for necessary action and reference. Proforma Invoice – Proforma Invoice is not a real invoice. It is prepared to give a clear idea regarding the amount that would be paid by the buyer if he places an order. This is prepared at the request of the buyer. 3. Receipt: When a firm receives cash from a customer it issues a receipt as a proof of receiving cash. The original copy is handed over to the party making payment and the duplicate is kept for future reference. This document contains date, amount, name of the party and the nature of payment. 5 Kinds of Receipts Small Businesses Should Take Extra Care to Keep Meal & Entertainment Receipts Receipts from Out of Town Business Travels Vehicle Related Receipts Receipts for Gifts Home Office Receipts 4 & 5. Debit and Credit Notes: These are prepared when goods are returned to supplier or when an additional amount is recoverable from a customer. When the purchaser returns the goods to the seller the Purchaser sends a Debit Note to the seller (i.e. the purchaser debits the seller in his books. Purchasers Books) and the Seller sends a Credit Note to the purchaser (i.e. the seller credits the Purchaser in his Books. Sellers Books). Following are the JVs to be passed:- Sales Return inward A/c     Dr.     To Debtor A/c (Being goods returned by the customer) Creditor A/c          Dr.    To Goods Return A/c  (Being goods sent back to the seller) 6. Voucher: It is a written document in support of a transaction. It is a proof of a particular transaction taking place for the value stated in the voucher. This is necessary to audit the account. In book keeping, voucher is the first document to record an entry. Normally three types of vouchers are used. Receipt voucher  Payment voucher  Journal voucher RECEIPT VOUCHER Receipt voucher...
read more

Alternative Competitive Advantage

David Kryscynski
read more

“Introduction to Strategic Management”

“Introduction to Strategic Management”
Strategic Management Video Lecture by David Kryscynski This is the introduction lecture for Strategic Management. Very Innovative and Informative video. A List of Strategic Management Terms Business – A strategy that pertains to single departments or units within a company.Combination – A type of grand strategy that employs several different grand strategies at once.Concentration – A growth strategy that extends the sale of current products or services to a company’s current market.Differentiation – A business strategy that strives to make the company’s product or service unique.Diversification – A growth strategy that moves a company into a similar kind of business with new or different products or services.Divestiture – A type of defensive strategy in which a company sells some part of its business, often an unprofitable part.Evaluating – The process of continuously monitoring the company’s progress toward its long-range goals and mission.Focus – A business strategy that directs marketing and sales towards a small segment of the market.Formal – The type of planning that involves systematic studying of an issue and the preparation of a written document to deal with the problem.Formulating strategy – Developing the grand- and business-level strategies to be used by the company.Functional – A strategy which involves short-range operational plans which support business strategies by emphasizing practical implementation.Goal – A concise statement that provides direction for employees and set standards for achieving the company’s strategic planGrand – A type of strategy that provides overall direction for the company.Growth – A type of grand strategy developed when a company tries to expand sales, products, or number of employees.Implementing – Putting a strategy to work after it has been formulated.Intermediate – Covers the time span between short-range and long-range, usually 1-3 years or 1-5 yearsLiquidation – A type of defensive strategy in which the entire company is sold or dissolved.Long Term– A three-to-five year period of time, but possibly as far as 20 years into the future.Mission Statement – A brief summary explaining why a company exists.Operational – Short-range planning that focuses on forming ideas for dealing with specific functions in the company.Overall Cost Leadership – A business strategy that is designed to produce and deliver a product or service for a lower cost than the competition.Planning – The process that businesses use to decide the company’s goals for the future and the ways to achieve those goals.Policy – A broad general guide to action that establishes boundaries within which employees must operate.Procedure – A detailed series of related steps of tasks written to implement a policy.Retrenchment – A type of strategy that aims to reverse negative trends in a company, such as losses in sales.Rule – A specific and definite corporate action that employees must follow.Short Term– A one-year period of time.Stability – A type of strategy that aims to keep the company operating at the same level that it has for several years.Strategic – Long-range planning done by the highest management levels in the company.Strategic Management – The application of the basic planning process at the highest levels of the company.Strategy – An outline of the basic steps management is going to take to achieve a goal.SWOT Analysis – The most utilized process for determining a company’s overall health; it involves analyzing internal strengths, internal weaknesses, external opportunities, and external threats.Turnaround – A type of defensive strategy that is used to regain success.Vertical Integration – A growth strategy that moves a company into a market it previously served either as a supplier or as a customer. Take The Test to Check Your Strategic...
read more

Business Policies-Guidelines to Attain Goals

Business Policies-Guidelines to Attain Goals
Business Policies – Framing and Execution Business policies are the keystone in the arch of management and the life-blood for the successful functioning of business, because without well-laid down policies, there cannot be lasting improvements in the economic condition of the firm and labor-management relations. A policy is a positive declaration and a command to its followers. It translates the goals of an organization into selected routes and provides the general guidelines that prescribe and proscribe programmes, which in turn, dictate practices and procedure. Attainment of Objectives: Buisness policies are general statement of principles for the attainment of objectives which serve as a guide to action for the executives at different levels of management. They pave a broad way in which the sub-ordinates tread along towards accomplishing their objectives. Hierarchy: For each set of objectives at each level, there is a corresponding set of policies. The Board of Directors determine the basic overall corporate policiesThe top management decides on the executive corporate policiesManagers decide on the departments / divisional policiesMiddle managers handle  the sectional policies Consistent Decisions contributing to the Objectives: The policies delimit the area within which a decision has to be made; however, they do allow some discretion on the part of the man on the firing line, otherwise, they would be mere rules. At the same time too much of discretion in policy matters may prove harmful to the accomplishment of organizational objectives and hence it is generally within limits. Mutual Application: Policies in general are meant for mutual application by sub ordinates. They are fabricated to suit a specific situation in which they are applied, for they cannot apply themselves. Unified Structure: Policies tend to predefine issues, avoid repeated analysis and give a unified structure to other types of plans, thus permitting managers to delegate authority while maintaining control. Policies for all Functional Areas: In a well-structured and managed organization, policies are framed for all functional levels of management. Corporate planningMarketingResearch and DevelopmentEngineeringManufacturingInventoryPurchasePhysical DistributionAccountingFinanceCostingAdvertisingPersonal SellingSpecial Promotion, are some areas that require clear-cut policies. Clear-Cut Guidelines: Policies serve an extremely useful purpose in that they avoid confusion and provide clear-cut guidelines. This enables the business to be carried on smoothly and often without break. They lead to better and maximum utilization of resources, human, financial and physical, by adhering to actions for...
read more

« Previous Entries Next Entries »